Halifax County is rich in historic homes.  In accordance with the Society Mission Statement to preserve historical information for dissemination to the public, the Society may assist homeowners through the arduous process of documenting and helping to obtain the national recognition deserved of these homes.

Currently there are twenty-seven county properties that have been listed on either or both the Virginia Historic Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places as well as five groups of homes and public buildings designated as “Historic Districts” in Virginia.

For additional information on the houses, please see An Architectural History of Halifax County, Virginia, published by the Halifax County Historical Society.

One home will be added periodically and will include a detailed description and photographs of the exterior and interior, if available.

 

Fourqurean House

Bold Springs Road

South Boston area

1830

 

 
Fourqurean House front.jpg.jpg
 

Fourqurean House

Bold Springs Road

South Boston area

1830

The Fourqurean House was built in 1830 by Daniel Winfrey Fourqurean. The story-and-a-half hall-and-parlor structure has a gable roof and is clad in beaded weatherboard. It sits on a brick foundation with an English basement and has an exterior brick chimney with stepped weathering on each gable end. Brick for the basement and chimneys is laid in five-course American bond. On one chimney, just above a small second-floor window, are three bricks with the initials and date, “M. W. F., DC 1830” although the “0” is etched above in a nearby brick. These are thought to be fifteen-year-old Matthew Winfrey Fourqurean’s initials (Daniel’s son) and “DC 1830” may stand for December 1830. Front and side porches have been added, based on evidence of earlier porches, and several of the nine-over-nine-pane windows are original.

The English basement stands eight feet above the ground and houses a summer kitchen and dining room. A steep winder stair gives access to a parlor on the first floor. Beside the parlor is a hall that houses an enclosed stair with risers that retain their original silver-gray marbleizing with veins of red, blue, and green. Both first-floor rooms have paneled wainscoting and Federal-era mantels. The mantel in the hall has reeding in the center and on the end panels. The parlor mantel has a plain frieze with reeded pilasters. Upstairs are two rooms having four-pane windows on each side of their respective chimney. An ell, added to the rear of the house and connected by a hyphen, is part of an 1820 dwelling moved to the site in 1970.

There are several original outbuildings, including a one-story stone kitchen with a gable-end chimney. The floor is paved with brick and stone, and the large arched fireplace contains cooking utensils including a crane. Located a quarter of a mile north of the main house is a story-and-a-half office constructed of v-notched logs (now covered by weatherboard) and a v-notched-log slave quarters.

Fourqurean purchased 60.25 acres of land from Benoy Gresham in 1828 to build his home. Thomas E. Puckett acquired the property in 1842, and William L. Owen, a merchant and financier, purchased the farm in 1844. Five years later, David L. Irvine assumed ownership. It stayed in possession of Irvine descendants, the Gray family, until 1968, when the farm was purchased by Robert L. and Maria Louisa Tate Gilliam.

The Gilliams named the complex Little Plantation, restored the buildings, and added two smokehouses, a loom house, and a carriage house. All are frame structures moved from other farms and date approximately to the same period as the house. The Gilliams opened the compound as a museum depicting early farm life in Southside Virginia. Although no longer open to the public, Little Plantation continues to be owned by the Gilliam family. It is listed in the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places.